Actions Taken by Women in Response to Intimate Partner Violence and Intimate Partner Violence Status at 1-Year Follow-Up

  • Molly K. Parker
    Correspondence
    Correspondence to: Molly K. Parker, MD, Medical University of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Ave., Charleston, SC 29425. Phone: (607) 368-0719.
    Affiliations
    Penn State College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
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  • Erik B. Lehman
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Present address: Lincoln Memorial University 6965 Cumberland Gap Pkwy, Harrogate, TN 37752.
    Marie Claire Abram
    Footnotes
    1 Present address: Lincoln Memorial University 6965 Cumberland Gap Pkwy, Harrogate, TN 37752.
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
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  • Carol S. Weisman
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
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  • Jennifer S. McCall-Hosenfeld
    Affiliations
    Penn State College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Present address: Lincoln Memorial University 6965 Cumberland Gap Pkwy, Harrogate, TN 37752.

      Abstract

      Background

      Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive public health issue with significant physical and mental health sequelae. A longer duration and greater severity of abuse are associated with adverse health outcomes and increased risk of revictimization. Current research has identified a variety of strategies used by women in response to abuse, but has not established whether the use of these strategies is associated with decreased IPV over time. For this study, we analyzed the associations between the use of specific actions in response to abuse—placating, resistance, informal or formal network help-seeking, safety planning, and substance use—and IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up.

      Methods

      Ninety-five women with past-year IPV at baseline participated in a 1-year follow-up survey measuring their use of specific actions in response to IPV and subsequent IPV status. IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up was analyzed as a function of types of actions taken and sociodemographic variables.

      Results

      Among women with past-year IPV at baseline ( N = 95), 53% reported no further IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up. In bivariate analysis, social support was associated with decreased risk of IPV victimization (odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18–0.99). In multivariable analyses, high use of placating (adjusted odds ratio, 9.40; 95% CI, 2.53–34.9), formal network help-seeking (adjusted odds ratio, 7.26; 95% CI, 1.97–26.74), and safety planning (adjusted odds ratio, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.02–8.69) strategies were associated with an increased risk of IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up.

      Conclusions

      Our data demonstrate that IPV exposure can change over time and that the use of specific actions in response to IPV can be indicators of risk of subsequent victimization. Abuse severity is an important potential confounder of action efficacy.
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      Biography

      Molly K. Parker, MD, is a graduate of Penn State College of Medicine and is currently a resident at the Medical University of South Carolina.

      Biography

      Erik B. Lehman, MS, is a Biostatistician at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.

      Biography

      Marie Claire Abram, BA, is a graduate of Bucknell University and is currently a fourth-year student at the DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee.

      Biography

      Carol S. Weisman, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Public Health Sciences, OB/GYN, and Health Policy and Administration at the Penn State College of Medicine. She is a sociologist and health services researcher who focuses on women's health care and policy.

      Biography

      Jennifer S. McCall-Hosenfeld, MD, MSc, is Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences and at the Pennsylvania State College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the primary care of women, especially rural women and survivors of intimate partner violence.